Marty DiGiacomo Collection

Truck Pictures



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Midwestern Freightliner and Bekins KW cabovers
were taken in ’80
Taken in ’73 at the Kane & Prospect St. Texaco I worked at, this GMC is delivering a load of fuel.
The driver actually let me get up top to take these rare shots.
The Texaco was company-owned and provided all uniforms, mechanical training and all the supplies to keep it looking clean and sharp.
It had 24 pumps, including the diesel pumps on the Kane St. side. We wore the full Texaco uniform, including the green shirts, black tie and non-scuff (no metal) belt.
If not too busy, two of us would go out to service a car, washing the windshield, rear window, check all the fluids under the hood, battery, belts, hoses and the tires. That was service!
   
This set of the green & white W900 was taken somewhere around Hershey or Gettysburg, PA around 1989.
   
White Oak Construction ran these beautiful orange B Model Macks to their jobsites. This one is at the Warehouse Point exit off I-91 in CT.
Taken around 1987-88?
Sweet Life ran these White Road Bosses out of Suffield, CT.
Here I’m taking a quick break on the side of the road somewhere in southern New England in the late 80’s.
They were known for their meaningful slogans on the side of the trailers, which were submitted by employees.
The union ran them out of business with higher and higher demands and vindictive actions by the loaders when their demands weren’t met.
Such a shame.

The newer Freightliners started coming in (around ’90?) to replace the White Road Bosses in the latter years of Sweet Life being in business. Here I have just backed in to a dock inside the building in Suffield, CT. It was pretty tight in there.Sweet Life ran these White Road Bosses out of Suffield, CT.
Here I’m taking a quick break on the side of the road somewhere in southern New England in the late 80’s.
They were known for their meaningful slogans on the side of the trailers, which were submitted by employees.
The union ran them out of business with higher and higher demands and vindictive actions by the loaders when their demands weren’t met.
Such a shame.

The newer Freightliners started coming in (around ’90?) to replace the White Road Bosses in the latter years of Sweet Life being in business. Here I have just backed in to a dock inside the building in Suffield, CT. It was pretty tight in there.
Carolina B Model Mack on I-84, Hartford, CT – 1970-73. Ford Louisville pulling a Finast (First National Foods) trailer on I-84 East in Hartford, CT – 1970-73.
Orange & white International 4300 (these had a really nice, wide cab for driver comfort) on I-84 East in Hartford, CT. 1970-73. Allied Peterbilt cabover with a drom box taken around 1970-73 at the Hamilton St. overpass, I-84 East in Hartford, CT.
I think this was a ’57 Autocar that sat outside of the Union 76 Truckstop off I-84 East in Southington, CT at this repair garage. It later became the American Eagle Truckstop and now it’s a T/A. I always dreamt of buyting this truck, but … you know how that goes. I was sorry to see it go. An old red GMC Astro sat next to it for some years as well.
70’s KW W900 for sale in Sturbridge, MA leased on with Nelson Freightways. They were out of CT somewhere. Taken in the late 80’s.
Overnite Mack MB taken in Warehouse Point, CT around 1987. Nice, clean single axle Overnite R Model Mack at the G. Fox Distribution Center in South Windsor (?), CT around 1987.
60’s Green & white cabover Pete seen in Southwick, MA around 1968-73.
We’d go up that route 10 & 202 on our way to Chester, MA and I’d always admire this Pete.
Pic was taken from the window of the car, so it’s not a great pic. At times, I’d see the guy with the wheels off and polishing the inside of the wheels and the axles.
This truck was kept in pretty much show condition. I spoke to the guy in the late 80’s and he had sold it to some local guy who kept begging for it. He painted it black, I think he did logging and he totally trashed the truck. What a waste!
     
I drove this ’85 R Model Mack for Ryder Distribution Systems for G. Fox & Co. out of CT. Here it sits at the DC dock. Back then the CB phrase was a “one stack Mack with a shack on the back” I took it a step further and would say “I gotta yellow and black, one stack Mack with a shack on the back, so cut me some slack, Jack!” Taken around ’87.
The Ryder Mack at a G. Fox store parking lot at a mall in CT. Taken in ’87. The interior of the R Model Mack I drove. Had a 10 spd. Roadranger and a Mack 350. Nice truck. The R Model Mack and exterior post trailer backed up to a dock in CT at the DC.
     
I drove this R Model Mack for GP out of Manchester, CT for awhile before the economy tanked after Weicker got in the governor’s mansion and raised all the taxes. Construction dropped 65% in one year due to his antics. Here I was delivering a load of lumber to somewhere in CT.
Here I was delivering a load of lumber to somewhere in CT. Here’s a load of tarped lumber with the R Model Mack on a rainy day in New England.
Cabover KW I drove for Ace Hardware, out of CT. These tractors had come out of Baltimore when they built the Ace DC in CT.
Pic taken around 1990 (?) at a store in upstate NY, I believe.
Interior of the Ace Hardware KW sleeper.
This cabover F Model Mack sleeper from Pionite pulled into our Texaco on I-84, exit 44 in W. Hartford, CT in 1973 on a rainy day.
Pionite was out of Shelton, CT. I was nuts about trucks back then (still in high school) and wished I’d be able to be running down the highway in one of those.
After my 4 years in the navy (‘74-‘78), I did start trucking in a ’74 Freightliner, then later in a ’76. At one point, in ’80, two of us took a ride to a bar in another driver’s F Model and I couldn’t believe how much rougher that ride was (no doubt it was a camelback suspension) than our spring ride Frieghtliner cavobover. Man, was I glad I never drove one of those. My kidneys would’ve come loose in no time. I say that because I later drove a ’69 Autocar dump truck for a few months for a construction company and the driver’s seat was mounted on a wood platform (no air ride seat) and I began to feel my kidneys in a bad way. I did some research and found out that kidneys coming loose was one of the possible consequences of drivers in the early days of trucking.
’76 White Freightliner I drove my last year with Midwestern Distribution, Ft. Scotte, KS in 1980.
Moss crackerbox GMC
was taken in Charlotte, NC on Atando Ave. in 1995.
White cabover for North American Van Lines that pulled into our Texaco fuel stop at exit 44 off I-84 in W. Hartford, CT in 1973 with his tandems falling apart on the trailer.
Truck sat there for several days after the little wrecker came in to assess the damage, which was very significant. Don’t know how they got it out of there, since it happened at a time when I wasn’t working.
Non-sleeper GMC Crackerbox parked at the Kane & Prospect St. Texaco in W. Hartford, CT at exit 44 off I-84 in 1973.
1973 - The No. American Van Lines near the red & white GMC Crackerbox had come off I-84 with his tandems making a heck of a loud racket as they were jostling back and forth with severe damage. Chunks of tire rubber were coming off as he somehow made the turn from Kane onto Prospect St. and then turned into the Texaco station near the diesel pumps. The wrecker near it was sent to assess the damage. It sat there for a few days before being removed somehow. The guy should have stopped long before he got to our station.





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