European Truck Pictures

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Location: Capellen. Luxemburg.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: December 2010 in Europe brought us a lot of snow and highwayclosure’s. Although the reasons of those closure’s were doubtfull. Like this one at December the 23th. The government of Wallone, the French speaking part of Belgium decided to close down highway E-411 and E-25 due to snowfall. Actually they were running out of salt and they were not able to keep the both highways going. I was on my way from St Avold to Maastricht. Normally a trip of three and a half hour drive. It took me seventeen and a half hour that day! At the Belgian-Luxemburgian stateborder the road was closed for any vehicles above the 7,5 tonnes.
Location: Capellen. Luxemburg.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: Waiting for more than five hours before we had a “go” from the Wallone government. “70” kliometres per hour was the dream of every trucker now.
Location: Capellen. Luxemburg.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: A long row of waiting big rigs on the hard shoulder into Luxemburg.
Location: Capellen. Luxemburg.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: And the row waiting big rigs again, as seen from the right lane. Lateron even the right lane was full of waiting big rigs.
Location: Capellen. Luxemburg.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: Picture taken in the direction of the Belgian stateborder. The rightlane is already modified to a parkingplace.
Location: Fraiture. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: At noon the Wallone government gave a green light, so the big convoy of big rigs moved into Belgium. However, after the highway-splitting of the E-411 and the E-25 near Neufchateau, the E-411 was still closed. So all those rigs had to carry on over the E-25, wich leaded us over the Baraque De Fraiture. With an elevation of 651 metress above sealevel ( 2136 feet ) it is, after the Baraque De Michel and the Botrange the third highest hill in Belgium. Always good for snow in the winter! However, climbing up the Baraque De Fraiture and as well on top of it the roads were clear. The mess shows up while descending the hill, as you can see on this picture.
Location: Fraiture. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: Snow and underneath the fresh snow there was ice. The average speed downhill was less then 5 kilometres ( 3 miles ).
Location: Near Vaux-Chavanne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: Once again…Ice Road Truckers European style.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: In the distance you can see a spinning rig of Damtransport. Once again the convoy came to a stop. Everyone tried to get on that hill but almost every rig blocked the road now. It took me five hours of waiting before I was able to run up the icy hill.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: The man with the spade…A chanceless mission with this hugh amount of snow falling down. It kept snowing from that afternoon untill Christmaseve. It brought the Belgian Ardennes about 70 centimetres ( 28 inches ) of snow. My hometown Gronsveld, wich is about 50 kilometres ( 31 miles ) to the north from here, suffered 50 centimetres ( 20 inches ) of snow. Our First white Christmas since many years.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: Waiting rigs again. Fourwheelers were able to pass on the hard shoulder, untill one of them blocked that too. So the E-25 became a large winterly parking lot.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: A never ending row of big rigs.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: My rig waiting, while the driver is taking a picture of it.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: For about an hour, even the fourwheelers came to a stop.
Location: Fagne. Belgium.
Date: December 2010.
Remarks: From 4 pm till 7 pm the next day it snowed like this in the whole wide area, including my hometown. At 6 pm I started to drive again. I was back home in Gronsveld at 22;30, without being in Maastricht. A long day, doing nothing more than waiting and driving.
Remarks: My hometown at dusk at Christmas Eve 2010.
Remarks: A white and cold Christmas waiting for us. Gronsveld, December the 24th. 2010.
Location: Near Vitry-le-Francois. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: After picking up a load of insulation an hour south of Saint Dizier in France, it was time to head back home again. No major highways on my way back home this time. I was enjoying the French landscape on my old straw routes from 15 years ago once again. I’m following my own shade while approaching the city of Vitry-le-Francois.
Location: Between Vitry-le-Francois and Chalons en Champagne. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: The wideness of the cornfields of the Region de la Champagne.
Location: Northbound D977, near Suippes. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: Long empty roads. Better than those traffic jams in the Netherlands and Belgium.
Location: Suippes. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: Impression of the town of Suippes.
Location: Near Sommepy-Tahure. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: When traveling on the D977 between Suippes and Attigny you will see the Ferme de Navarin monument rising up on the former battlefield of WorldWar one. Le Ferme de Navarin was a farm on top of the hill where the Allieds and the Germans had a huge battle. Inside there’s a memorial. Underneath there’s a mass grave within the remains of the more than 10.000 soldiers who got killed on the plains of Champagne. In the surrounding area you can still see the barbed wire and the trenches. The leftovers of some of the trenches you can see on this pic in front of the monument.
Location: Near Mazagran. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: The plains of Champagne. Including the modern windmills.
Location: Near Grivy-Loisy. France.
Date: January 2011.
Remarks: Enjoying the view of the Champagne near Grivy-Loisy on the D987.




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